Browsing the archives for the Education category.

Let’s Put British Values Back Into British Schools

by Calvin Robinson on March 17, 2017.

Originally published on Conservative Way Forward.

I recently had the honour of visiting a fantastic new Free School in North West London. A school very different to the majority of inner-city state schools today, a school that has rejected the postmodern approach to education, in favour of a more traditional education based on the teacher-lead passing down of knowledge. Upon entering this school, which shall remain nameless for reasons that will become clear, my colleagues on the local council and I could clearly hear children practising the National Anthem, something that I cannot say I’ve ever encountered in my many visits to schools throughout the capital.

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During our chat with the Headmistress, we were informed that all students were currently learning the National Anthem in Music lessons, to sing at the start of each school day in a whole school celebration of Britishness. At lunch time that day, we witnessed a member of the Senior Leadership Team congratulating the students on their performance and reminding them that no matter where they come from, whatever race, religion, or creed, they should all be proud to be British. This school consists of a large majority of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) students, but all seemed equally proud to celebrate their diversity and their Britishness together, as a school community.

Unfortunately, the Headmistress didn’t yet feel comfortable publicising the fact that her school is teaching their students the National Anthem, through fear of a public backlash. What a sorry state we’re in as a nation, when children cannot learn to sing the National Anthem. If not in school, then where should we be learning the anthem of our nation? It seems to me that we’ve reached the point where we’ve become so obsessed with appearing to be tolerant of others, that we have become intolerant of ourselves. We’re afraid of celebrating our own culture.

There is nothing wrong with celebrating British values. Democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect, tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs are all values we should hold in esteem. Sure, they might not be values that are unique to the United Kingdom, but they are certainly not universal values around the world, not even amongst our closest allies. British values should be celebrated, shared and encouraged.

The Teachers’ Standards, the rules governing the behaviour of all qualified teaching professionals in the UK, is often misquoted as insisting teachers ‘promote British values’. In fact, the Teachers’ Standards merely states that teachers should ‘not undermine fundamental British values’. That’s quite a significant difference, and one that should be corrected. British schools should be at the forefront of protecting and promoting British values to each generation.

Singing the national anthem and flying the Union Flag at school should be a daily routine, as part of a wider PSHE/Citizenship curriculum designed to instil and reinforce British values​. It’s hard to image many schools even flying St George’s cross on St George’s Day these days, through fear of offending. We’re all too happy to wear green on St Patrick’s Day, though. Why is it that left have become so comfortable celebrating everyone else’s culture, but frown upon the mere mention of celebrating the incredibly rich and diverse culture of Great Britain?

Immigrants claiming British citizenship swear an allegiance to the Queen, yet British-born children are left out of that practice. We should be uniting all British citizens under a common Oath of Allegiance, singing the national anthem together and flying the Union Flag. These symbols are a nod to our joint beliefs in freedom of liberty, tolerance, democracy and law. We should never forget that.

Maybe, just maybe, if we stopped worrying about the things that separate us, and started focusing on the many great things that unite us, we’d be in a much better place as a nation.

Education
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Our young people are being indoctrinated towards a left-wing bias

by Calvin Robinson on June 25, 2016.

As published on Conservatives for Liberty

The country is evidently split right now. The results of the referendum were as close as expected, even if didn’t land on the side we’d anticipated. People had plenty of reasons for voting Remain or Leave, and I’m not going to go into them here. But what I find interesting about this referendum is that the division between Leave and Remain voters isn’t just a regional one, there’s a clear age gap involved.

I keep reading the argument that 2/3rds of young people voted Remain, and therefore it is the older generations who are out of touch. Well, as a young person myself I put it to you that the case may actually be the other way around.

Our young people are being indoctrinated to a left-wing mentality from a very young age. Pretty much throughout their entire educational career, young people are being trained into a lefty way of thinking. I’ve seen this first hand on too many occasions and it leaves me constantly concerned. Some of the behaviour I’ve seen from teachers is outright disgusting – a very evident bias not only in their teaching practises, but in the way they present their arguments. I’m not talking about the obvious party political biases of “Labour = Good, Tory = Evil”, although that does happen, but most teachers take a less obvious approach along the lines of tolerance being a good thing, so long as you agree with their way of thinking.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve witnessed teachers engaging in conversations with students about the EU referendum. Instead of encouraging students to keep an open mind, or challenging students’ perceptions, teachers have been encouraging their biases. For instance, in a recent conversation a student mentioned how close the Leave numbers were getting to taking Remain’s lead, based on polls, and a teacher’s response was “I know, it’s quite scary isn’t it”. The teacher and student were in mutual agreement that Britain leaving the EU would be a bad thing. As far as I’m aware, that goes against part two of the Teachers’ Standards.

On the other hand, I have personally been discouraged from even mentioning the EU referendum. On Friday 24th June, when the results were in, I was taken aside by my headteacher and deputy headteacher as I arrived at school and warned not to bring up the topic in front of teachers, as they were all very angry about the situation right now, and warned not to bring up the subject in front of students, as “many of our kids are from Europe”, therefore completely missing the point of the Leave argument, or indeed my argument for voting Leave. At no point have I mentioned that immigration was a bad thing, in fact I have been pro-immigration throughout, much in line with Dan Hannan’s stance. Regardless, this wasn’t a referendum on being a part of Europe, this was about regaining our freedom of democracy and our sovereignty, from the overly-political European Union.

Our country have just made one of the biggest decisions we’ll probably make in a generation. We should be encouraging our students to talk about it, and engage in important political issues. We certainly shouldn’t be censoring one side of the argument, especially when it’s the side that won.

There is an assumption that all Leave voters are racist xenophobes, something I addressed in my recent article, why I am voting to Leave the EU. That is clearly not the case, but what’s concerning is the censorship around any right-wing arguments and the evident bias towards left-wing arguments in schools, thus confirming the left=good, right=bad agenda. There is no balance. It’s perfectly okay to hold left wing opinions in schools, in fact it’s encouraged. And schools will talk about (see: preach) how important tolerance is, but the moment you express an opinion that isn’t in line with their thinking, you’ll see how short lived their tolerance truly is.

I had an email from our Executive Headteacher this morning, that’s the person above our school’s Headteacher, she’s essentially in charge of all schools in the Trust. The email, sent out to all teaching staff across the Trust, included a link to the petition requesting another referendum. Not only is this demonstrating a complete disregard for democracy, but it is once again backing up my argument that schools are so left-leaning that they can’t even acknowledge that in their attempts to be politically correct and unbiased, they are actually doing the complete opposite.

I’m not at all surprised that the majority of young people voted in-line with a left-wing agenda to remain in the un-democratic, or even anti-democratic European Union. Schools have been grooming children towards this decision for years.

Should schools be politically neutral, or should they be made to declare their political allegiances? Surely there should be some system in place to prevent our younger generations from left-wing brainwashing. I know of one teacher who reported a student to Prevent recently, for supporting UKIP. It’s getting ridiculous. “Our way, or no way”.

 

Education
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We need to recruit and retain more teachers. Here’s how.

by Calvin Robinson on January 31, 2016.

Originally published on ConservativeHome.com

We are in the early stages of a recruitment crisis in education. Headteachers, unions and the government predicted as much a few years ago, and we’re now at the stage where teaching positions aren’t being filled, teachers are job-sharing, and schools are bussing pupils to sister schools for lessons. There aren’t enough people entering the profession, and there are record numbers of people leaving it. It’s time for schools to start thinking outside of the box and stop relying on the Government to solve the problem for them.

This week, the Daily Telegraph reported that schools are providing healthcare, free gym memberships and golden handshakes as a bonus to try and entice more applicants. At the same time, six teaching unions are fighting to increase the annual pay rise above one per cent. The Government has made great strides in this area already, allowing schools to set their own policies on how they recruit and retain staff, and allowing schools to pay good staff more.

These approaches are all well and good, but they’re not addressing the primary issue of why people are not entering or staying in the profession. Schools will never be able to compete with the private sector as far as pay is concerned – and that’s not the major barrier for entry for a lot of teachers. Schools need to become more pro-active in other ways, if they want to recruit more great teachers.

There’s plenty of room for innovation in education.  It’s a sector held back by a vocal minority’s fear of change, as with most union heavy-influenced professions. More schools could partner directly with universities and graduate schemes such as School Direct and Teach First, to encourage trainee teachers to join their schools.

Education as a whole needs far better links with industry, too. Schools should be reaching out to companies to create philanthropic enterprise projects – getting employees to spend an hour a week in a school, sharing their expertise through extra-curricular activities, or even simply sharing their real-world expectations. This would be a real bonus: a majority of our teachers have no industry experience of their own, so they should be encouraged to seek out those who do, to share expectations of what students will experience once they enter the world of employment. But by strengthening links between industry and education, we bring a much wider range of skills and expertise into the school environment.

​Of course, enticing people into the teaching profession is only half of the job at hand. The larger problem is keeping them, and that has very little to do with pay (no one becomes a teacher for the money), and more to do with bad management and ever increasing teacher workloads. I have written previously for Conservative Teachers about how poorly trained middle-leaders are harming our schools; that and the workload issue are a more difficult challenge for schools to face. But it’s necessary that they do.

Planning, marking, data entry, extra-curricular activities, break, lunch and after-school duties, long working hours and work during weekends and holidays are just a few of the many responsibilities that pile on a teacher’s workload – all of which could be downsized or managed by the school. If you speak to any teacher, you’re most likely to hear the same story these days, they love the job – the actual teaching – but it’s all the extra responsibilities on top of it that get in the way and cause them to work in a constant state of tiredness.

You can only maintain that lifestyle for so long, before you either break down or leave for better pastures. It’s an unhealthy lifestyle. Schools need to stop throwing buzz words around, like “we encourage our teachers to maintain a work/life balance” and put some actual policies and procedures into place to make this possible. There’s simply too much to do in this profession, and not enough time to do it all, not properly anyhow.

Something has to give and at the moment, it seems, that’s usually the job. The scary fact is that nearly two thirds of teachers are considering leaving within the next two years. Where will that leave us, if a majority of our teachers quit? With an increased workload for the remainder – that’s where. We have a limited time to address this issue. Schools, headteachers and teachers’ unions need to put their heads together and come up with some sensible solutions about how to adjust the actual role of a teacher into something more efficient and manageable. That in itself will make the job more appealing.

Education
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Poorly trained middle-leaders are harming our schools

by Calvin Robinson on December 10, 2015.

Originally published on ConservativeTeachers.com

Workload is one of the ever hot topics in education. Teachers are – often rightly –  voicing their dissatisfaction with the ever increasing amount of work piled on their plates, which is affecting their ability to get on and teach effectively. Nicky Morgan has expressed an interest in this topic and is looking at ways of alleviating some of the pressures passed on to teachers from senior management. However, I’m not sure the problem stops there. We should take a better look at our middle management structures, to adjust what could potentially be a bottleneck in the system.

Many middle leaders have been promoted to the role because they are fantastic teachers. This is a problem in and of itself. Being a great teacher does not necessarily make one a good manager. The majority of middle managers in schools have progressed through the traditional route of School > University > PGCE and of course back in to school, meaning they have no ‘real world’ experience to guide them in this more senior role.  Too often, teachers profess that working in a school feels like being back in school, due to the way that staff are treated. This is because our middle managers usually have no industry experience, little to no management training and are sometimes promoted above their level of competence.

This becomes a problem when we’re asking for more top-down support, whether it be in behaviour management systems or simply staff morale. Your school could employ the best ‘super head’ in the country, but if his/her messages, policies and enthusiasm are getting halted at a bottle neck of over-worked under-trained middle management, it’ll do no one any good. What was once a brilliant asset can instantly become a hindrance to the school, through no fault of their own.

There are a few ways we could improve this situation. Of course we could provide better management training to those promoted to middle management roles, and/or encourage all teachers to take some time in industry, to further expand their subject knowledge and real-world business skills. But another solution would be to simply create more admin roles in schools. If all schools had more administrative employees along the lines of office managers or civil servants, they could focus on monitoring targets and filling in spreadsheets, while the good teachers are left to do just that, teach. After all, isn’t that why we got into this job in the first place? To facilitate learning, not to tick boxes.

Education
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Brent Council are denying parents the choice they deserve

by Calvin Robinson on November 22, 2015.

Originally published on ConservativeTeachers.com

With the demand for good secondary school places in Brent ever increasing, and a sufficient number of Free Schools failing to open in the area, is it a case of the Labour-lead Brent Council dangerously hampering the borough? I decided to conduct some research into the issue by using the Freedom of Information Act to request details of meetings by the Brent Council Teacher’s Panel.

Below are the minutes from the last meeting of the Teachers’ Joint Consultative Committee (7 July 2015); specifically these are items raised by the ‘Teachers’ Panel’:

The council’s attitude and possible actions regarding new academies and free
schools

The Teachers’ Panel referred to the Kilburn Grange School due to be opened in 2015
and asked to receive information on the number of places that would be allocated for
Brent students. They also heard that Gateway School was not proceeding and that
while Gladstone School had submitted plans to the DFE and the council’s planning
department, there was discussion of the number of forms of entry. The earliest it would
open would be September 2016 possibly on a temporary site.
The Teachers’ Panel highlighted the action being taken around the country against the
government policies on Free Schools and Academies and that parents were becoming
increasingly aware that the justification for the introduction of the policies was not
related to increasing parental choice. They called on the council to do the minimum
required to comply with legislation but to join teachers’ unions in pointing out the
shortcomings of the policy and make parents aware of the council’s position. The Chair
asked it to be recorded that discussion on this was taking place within the Labour
Group.

As you can see, Brent Council’s Teacher’s Panel has “called on the council to do the minimum required to comply with legislation but to join teachers’ unions in pointing out the shortcomings of the policy and make parents aware of the council’s position”. Surely the council’s position should be to increase the number of good school places available to children in the borough? Brent has such a high demand for good school places, it’s irresponsible of the Labour-run Brent Council to oppose the idea of Free Schools simply to oppose a Conservative government’s policy. The issue is too important for them to be playing party politics.

If we look back to the Michaela Community School situation, it’s a well known but little reported fact that Brent Council made the process as difficult as possible for them. Even after the application to open a Free School in Brent was accepted by the Department for Education, Brent Council placed roadblocks in the paths of Michaela’s board of trustees at every turn, to the point that it was questioned whether the school would actually be able to open. When a bid was placed on the old Brent Town Hall, for example, it was rejected in place of an offer from the French Lycée International School. While the Lycée may be a brilliant project, it won’t offer the secondary school places that are needed in Brent, and the deal on the table happened to be significantly less than what DfE/Michaela were offering. On the one hand Brent Council are claiming budget cuts as one of the main reasons for the majority of their bad decisions as of late, while on the other hand they’re biting their nose off to spite their face by accepting an offer for a French curriculum primary school offering much less value than that of an English curriculum secondary school in an area where demand for good school places outweighs supply.

Michaela Free School: allocation of pupil places for September 2015

The Teachers’ Panel made enquiries of the number of places at Michaela School in Wembley Park and heard that there had been 321 applications for 120 places of 4FE.

In the end, Michaela went for a private property deal and as a result were the first Free School to successfully open in Brent, and are doing a fantastic job of educating hundreds of Brent children, with demand at nearly 3 times the current intake. But many Free School projects have failed to get off the ground in Brent and it’s becoming obvious why.

It has been speculated for a while now that Labour councils are getting in the way of a good secondary education. But with Free School applicants not be able to speak publicly about the issue, for obvious reasons, there hasn’t been much evidence to focus on until now. This Brent Council Teacher’s Panel report was obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request – it may well be that more councils are operating under similar pretences.

Have you witnessed similar opposition to Free Schools in your own borough? Get in touch if you’d like to share your experiences.

Education
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